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Globalization Of Islam:


Part 1

Since the early 1970s, western Europeans and North Americans have become increasingly concerned about an apparent change in the nature and patterns of human migration.  For some this change threatens to alter the ethnic and religious composition of their nation-states, their democratic and capitalist traditions, and their liberal social values.  The emigration and settlement of Muslims from more than seventy nations to the West has been of some concern.  For those in the West who believe in the purity of race, civilization, and culture, or in a super-sessionist “Judeo-Christian” worldview, this movement of Muslims is a menacing threat to what they believe to be a homogeneous Western society.  For others it increasingly represents a significant demographic shift that posits a major cultural challenge, the precise consequences of which are unpredictable and unforeseen, because they require a variety of adjustments by both the host countries and the new immigrants.

DATE LAST EDITED:  03-2020 

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The Globalization Of Islam:


Part 2

World War I was the turning point in almost every aspect of life in much of the Muslim World, perhaps most importantly in the Middle East.  It created vast new hopes and possibilities, and consequently even more bitter disappointments and insoluble problems.  It ushered in a new era of historical writing marked by several characteristics: growing professionalization (with several scholars getting doctorates in Europe, especially from Paris), institutionalized within the new universities of Cairo, Istanbul, Tehran, and Aligarh; a much closer approximation in form and methodology to the kinds of historical writing practiced in Europe; and a definition of persistent subject-matter areas, somewhat different for each of the linguistic/cultural realms.  One apparently odd product of the period was a marked bilingualism among the new generation of historians, who often wrote in French or English for European audiences, and in Arabic, Persian, Turkish, or Urdu for their countrymen; in the latter works the cultural agendas and conflicts of their native countries came to the fore.  This phenomenon continues in the present.

DATE LAST EDITED:  03-2020 

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The Globalization Of Islam:


Part 3

World War II marked another watershed as the domination of the region by Great Britain and France collapsed, to be replaced by a bipolar world of AmericanSoviet rivalry.  At least until the early 1970s, and in some arenas until the present, intellectuals in the Arab lands and Iran tended to interpret their past within a single broad framework, as a struggle against foreign domination — by England and France in the modern period, of course, but often by fellow (Mamlūk amirs, Arab invaders, and so on) in the medieval past.  In the revolutionary age beginning in the mid1950s, it was inevitable that many would also begin to look seriously at Marxism as an intellectual tradition, and thus to link issues of internal class struggle with longestablished concerns about imperialism. Muslims.

DATE LAST EDITED:  03-2020