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THE MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD

Founded in Ismāīlīyah, Egypt, in 1928 by asan alBannā’ (1906–1949), the Muslim Brotherhood (alIkhwān alMuslimūn) is the parent body and the main source of inspiration for many Islamist organizations in Egypt and several other Arab countries, including Syria, Sudan, Jordan, Kuwait, Yemen, and some North African states. 

Muslim Brotherhood Flag

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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Muslim Brotherhood In Egypt

Contemporary Islamic social and political activism in Egypt is rooted in the founding in 1928 by asan alBannā’ of Jamīyat alIkhwān alMuslimūn (Society of Muslim Brothers; also known as the Muslim Brotherhood or the Ikhwān).  From the beginning, the Ikhwān’s goals were both social and political, promoting the causes of benevolence, charity, and development, on the one hand, and nationalism, independence, and Islamism, on the other.  

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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Muslim Brotherhood

In Syria

Throughout its fifty years of activty in Syria, the Muslim Brotherhood has been principally an opposition movement that has never held political power.  The brotherhood traces its origins to the 1930s, when the Syrian people were engaged in their struggle to achieve national independence from French rule.  

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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Muslim Brotherhood

In Syria

The Syrian Muslim Brotherhood (i.e., the Syrian Brotherhood or the Brotherhood) was formed in 1945 as an affiliate of the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood.  The Syrian Brotherhood actively participated in Syrian politics until 1963, when the incoming pan-Arab Baath party began restricting the movement before ultimately banning the party in 1964.  In 1964,

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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Muslim Brotherhood


In Jordan

An enduring feature of Jordanian political life for more than fifty years, the Muslim Brotherhood in Jordan was created as part of an effort by the leader of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, asan alBannā’ (1906–1949), to form additional bases of support for his movement.

DATE LAST EDITED: 07-2019  

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Muslim Brotherhood


In Jordan

The Jordanian Brotherhood was founded in 1945 as the Muslim Brotherhood Society, and was licensed by the government the following year as a charity affiliated with the Egyptian Brotherhood.  The organization changed its name to the MBG in 1953 after the government issued the group a second license to operate as an Islamic religious organization.  

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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Muslim Brotherhood


In the Sudan

The Muslim Brothers originated among Sudanese students in Cairo in the 1940s.  Jamāl alDīn alSanhūrī and ādiq Abdallāh Abd alMājid were among its earliest propagators; in 1946 they were sent by the Egyptian movement to recruit members in the Sudan.  They succeeded in setting up branches in several small towns in 1947–1949 but were barred from acting openly unless they declared their independence from the Egyptian Brothers, who were at the time illegal. luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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Muslim Brotherhood


In the Sudan

The National Congress Party (NCP) in Sudan is the successor organization to the Brotherhood-affiliated National Islamic Front (NIF).  Long steeped in controversy, the NCP and its precursors have associated themselves with such notorious terrorists as Osama bin Laden and a variety of extremist groups including al-Qaeda, Hamas, and Hezbollah.  

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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The Muslim Brotherhood

Plan For

Destruction Of America

From Within

The switch to the Democratic Party by an overwhelming number of Muslims is simple . . . It is the same party that wants to stifle religion yet backs the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) on Resolution 16/18 on issues of freedom of religion and speech.  In other words: making it a criminal offense to speak negatively on Islam or Muslims. 

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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The Muslim Brotherhood

In The

 Palestinian Authority

The Muslim Brotherhood’s presence in the Palestinian territories dates back to the 1960s, when the group established a set of charities in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.  From the 1960s to the 1980s, the Brotherhood continued to amass support within the Palestinian territories.  In 1987, a group of Brotherhood activists established a formal Palestinian branch of the Brotherhood, Hamas. 

 

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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The Muslim Brotherhood

In Qatar

The official Qatari chapter of the Muslim Brotherhood disbanded in 1999, but Qatar has continued to provide the organization with financial, media and diplomatic support including through the Qatari-owned satellite network Al Jazeera, which has been accused of bias toward the Brotherhood.  Qatar is also home to prominent Brotherhood leaders such as the group’s spiritual leader, Yusuf al-Qaradawi.

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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The Muslim Brotherhod

In Somalia

Al-Islah was formed in 1978 by Brotherhood member Sheikh Mohamed Garyare.  In 1981, Somali President Mohamed Siad Barre began arresting political dissidents and cracking down on civil liberties in response to mounting opposition.  

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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The Muslim Brotherhood

In Tunisia

The Muslim Brotherhood’s activity in Tunisia is tied to that of the political party Ennahda.  Founded by Islamist cleric Rached Ghannouchi in 1981 as the Islamic Tendency Movement (ITM), the party drew inspiration from Muslim Brotherhood and its ideology.  ITM rebranded as Ennahda (meaning, “Awakening” or “Renaissance”) in 1989.  The Tunisian government banned the party that year after it won second place in parliamentary election.  Ennahda formally relaunched during the Tunisian revolution in 2011.

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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The Muslim Brotherhood

In Turkey

There is no political party in Turkey that distinctively and openly represents the Muslim Brotherhood (i.e., the Brotherhood).  Some members of the leading Justice and Development Party (AKP), however — including Turkish President Recep Erdoğan — have provided various forms of support to the Brotherhood, including granting asylum to wanted Brotherhood members and equipping them with satellite television and radio stations.  Despite being charged in absentia by the Egyptian government, some Brotherhood fugitives have been allowed to openly congregate in Turkey and organize against the Egyptian government.

DATE LAST EDITED: 07-2019  

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The Muslim,Brotherhood

In The United Arab Emirates

(UAE)

The Muslim Brotherhood in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is known as al-Islah, or the Association for Reform and Guidance.  The group says it shares a similar ideology with Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, though it denies direct links with the Islamist movement.  Al-Islah was founded as a non-governmental organization (NGO) in 1974, three years after the UAE’s independence from Britain.  

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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The Muslim Brotherhood

In Yemen

The Muslim Brotherhood first emerged in Yemen in the 1960s and 1970s, when U.N.-sanctioned Abd al-Majeed al-Zindani — the founder of the Brotherhood’s branch in Yemen — led a group of clerics to establish a religious schooling system in northern Yemen.  Following the 1990 merger of North and South Yemen, Zindanico-founded Islamist political party al-Islah (“Congregation for Reform”) with the support of then-President Ali Abdullah Saleh. 

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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The Muslim Brotherhood

In Morocco

The Justice and Development Party (PJD) — also known as the Islamic Party of Justice and Development — is the ruling party in Morocco.  Until 2013, the PJD was the Moroccan branch of the Muslim Brotherhood (i.e., the Brotherhood), though the party has formally disavowed the Brotherhood following the ouster of former Egyptian President and Brotherhood leader Mohammed Morsi. 

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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The Muslim Brotherhood

In Iraq

The Iraqi Islamic Party (IIP) is the Iraqi branch of the Muslim Brotherhood (i.e., the Brotherhood).  Established in 1960, the IIP was swiftly banned by Iraqi nationalists and remained outlawed under the regime of former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein (1979-2003).  The IIP resurfaced after Hussein’s fall from power in 2003, and has since grown to become the largest Sunni political party in Iraq.

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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The Muslim Brotherhood

In Bahrain

The Muslim Brotherhood began its operations in Bahrain in 1941, marking the establishment of the first major Brotherhood branch in the Gulf.  The Bahraini branch of the Brotherhood, known as al-Menbar al-Watani, organizes charities and participates in the country’s political process, with the stated goal of instating Islamic laws into Bahrain’s constitution and charter.  As with other branches in the Gulf, the Brotherhood has traditionally accommodated the ruling regime in Bahrain, and sought gradual reform toward an Islamist society.  

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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The Muslim Brotherhood

In Algeria

The Muslim Brotherhood (i.e., the Brotherhood) first emerged in Algeria in the 1950s as a religious association.  In the 1990s, the Algerian Brotherhood launched a political party, the Movement of Society for Peace (“Harakat mujtama’ as-silm” or MSP).  Since its formation, the MSP has worked from within Algeria’s political system to advocate for the national adoption of Islamic ideals in Algeria, including the establishment of shari’a (Islamic law). 

DATE LAST EDITED: 07-2019  

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The Muslim Brotherhood

In Kuwait

The Muslim Brotherhood is represented in Kuwait by the Islamic Constitutional Movement (ICM), a minority political party that seeks to instate shari’a (Islamic law) as the country’s primary source of legislation.  The Kuwaiti Brotherhood also operates a charitable arm known as the Social Reform Society (SRS), sanctioned as a terrorist organization by Russia and Kazakhstan and accused by the latter of financing terrorist activity and engaging in “armed jihad.”

DATE LAST EDITED:  07-2019 

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The Muslim Brotherhood

In Libya

The Libyan branch of the Muslim Brotherhood (i.e., the Brotherhood) is one of the largest Islamist parties in the country.  Brotherhood members in Libya lead the country’s rogue Islamist government in Tripoli — known as the Government of National Salvation (GNS) — while also having members in the country’s unity government State Council.  The Brotherhood has also maintained strong ties to Islamist militias that once backed the former Islamist General National Council (GNC).  Three of the Libya Dawn militias are directly allied with the Brotherhood: the 17 February Martyrs Brigade (17 Feb), the Misrata militias, and the Libyan Revolutionaries Operations Room (LROR).

DATE LAST EDITED: 11-2019